Ashes, Ashes…

chimney tips, News
Is it a good idea to remove ashes from the fireplace or wood stove every time you build a fire? Wood burners know that the consistent by-product of having a wood fire is ash.  While the volume is going to be determined by the actual species of wood; softwoods weigh less and will have the potential to generate more ash.  In any case there will always be ash remaining in the combustion chamber after the wood fuel is burned. There are many ways this ash can be put to good use. Did you know that it is not a good idea to remove the ash from the fireplace or wood stove every time you build a fire? Having a 1-inch layer of ash on the floor of the firebox during…
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100 Reasons Your Fireplace Doesn’t Work “CSIA”

chimney tips, News
"Why fireplaces work, and how best to build them, has been a topic of hot debate literally for centuries. From the first stone rings stacked around the campfire, to the modern factory built fireplaces with carefully engineered dimensions, there has been a steady evolution of design parameters to make sure they draw well and cast as much heat as possible. Most of this evolution has been by trial and error, and some designs work much better than others. Simply put, fireplaces work mainly because hot air rises. When you start a fire, the air inside the chimney becomes warmer and less dense than the air outside the chimney, and consequently it starts to rise. As the warm air rises, cooler air from the room flows into the firebox, fanning the…
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The Best Wood

chimney tips, News
  'It is far more important that the fuel be dry as compared to the species. Do not burn any construction scraps of treated or painted wood, especially treated wood from decks or landscaping ties. The chemicals used can release dangerous amounts of arsenic and other very toxic compounds into your house. If the "seasoned wood" you bought turned out to be pretty green and you elected to try to burn it anyway, be sure to have the chimney checked more often than usual, you may build up creosote very quickly. You don't have to burn only premium hardwoods. Less dense woods like elm and even soft maple are abundant and make fine firewood as long as you're willing to make a few extra trips to the woodpile. If you…
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