Ashes, Ashes…

chimney tips, News
Is it a good idea to remove ashes from the fireplace or wood stove every time you build a fire? Wood burners know that the consistent by-product of having a wood fire is ash.  While the volume is going to be determined by the actual species of wood; softwoods weigh less and will have the potential to generate more ash.  In any case there will always be ash remaining in the combustion chamber after the wood fuel is burned. There are many ways this ash can be put to good use. Did you know that it is not a good idea to remove the ash from the fireplace or wood stove every time you build a fire? Having a 1-inch layer of ash on the floor of the firebox during…
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House Logic Discusses the Advantages of a Wood Stove

News, Wood Stove
[gallery columns="2" type="slideshow" ids="356,357,358,359" orderby="rand"] 'Although wood stoves might conjure up images of a smoke-belching potbelly in a backwoods cabin, today’s models are efficient heaters that meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission guidelines and reduce heating bills by nearly half when energy prices are high. Unlike fireplaces, wood stoves can heat a whole room or possibly even your whole house, depending on its layout. And their prefabricated chimney pipes let you install them practically anywhere—even in front of an existing hearth. But even if you invest in multiple wood stoves to heat your entire house, you’re wise to keep your furnace winter ready. There’s no 24-hour service for wood stoves, and you don’t want to chance a bad cold snap that’ll freeze your pipes. What do they cost? A good…
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FAQs

News
Q. How often should I have my chimney swept? This a tougher question than it sounds. The simple answer is: The National Fire Protection Association Standard 211 says, "Chimneys, fireplaces, and vents shall be inspected at least once a year for soundness, freedom from deposits, and correct clearances. Cleaning, maintenance, and repairs shall be done if necessary." This is the national safety standard and is the correct way to approach the problem. It takes into account the fact that even if you don't use your chimney much, animals may build nests in the flue or there may be other types of deterioration that could make the chimney unsafe to use. The Chimney Safety Institute of America recommends that open masonry fireplaces should be swept at 1/8" of sooty buildup, and sooner…
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