Ashes, Ashes…

chimney tips, News
Is it a good idea to remove ashes from the fireplace or wood stove every time you build a fire? Wood burners know that the consistent by-product of having a wood fire is ash.  While the volume is going to be determined by the actual species of wood; softwoods weigh less and will have the potential to generate more ash.  In any case there will always be ash remaining in the combustion chamber after the wood fuel is burned. There are many ways this ash can be put to good use. Did you know that it is not a good idea to remove the ash from the fireplace or wood stove every time you build a fire? Having a 1-inch layer of ash on the floor of the firebox during…
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House Logic Discusses the Advantages of a Wood Stove

News, Wood Stove
[gallery columns="2" type="slideshow" ids="356,357,358,359" orderby="rand"] 'Although wood stoves might conjure up images of a smoke-belching potbelly in a backwoods cabin, today’s models are efficient heaters that meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission guidelines and reduce heating bills by nearly half when energy prices are high. Unlike fireplaces, wood stoves can heat a whole room or possibly even your whole house, depending on its layout. And their prefabricated chimney pipes let you install them practically anywhere—even in front of an existing hearth. But even if you invest in multiple wood stoves to heat your entire house, you’re wise to keep your furnace winter ready. There’s no 24-hour service for wood stoves, and you don’t want to chance a bad cold snap that’ll freeze your pipes. What do they cost? A good…
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100 Reasons Your Fireplace Doesn’t Work “CSIA”

chimney tips, News
"Why fireplaces work, and how best to build them, has been a topic of hot debate literally for centuries. From the first stone rings stacked around the campfire, to the modern factory built fireplaces with carefully engineered dimensions, there has been a steady evolution of design parameters to make sure they draw well and cast as much heat as possible. Most of this evolution has been by trial and error, and some designs work much better than others. Simply put, fireplaces work mainly because hot air rises. When you start a fire, the air inside the chimney becomes warmer and less dense than the air outside the chimney, and consequently it starts to rise. As the warm air rises, cooler air from the room flows into the firebox, fanning the…
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